The Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English PDF

Details about The Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English PDF

2527 Pages – 2013 – 51.5 MB – 39765 Downloads – English

The Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English PDF

The Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English PDF free download – Eric Partridge made a deep and enduring contribution to the study and understanding of slang. In the eight editions of the Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English published between 1937 and 1984, Partridge recorded and defined the slang and unconventional English of Great Britain, and to a lesser extent her dominions, from the 1600s through the 1970s. For the years up until 1890, Partridge was by his own admission quite reliant on Farmer and Henley’s Slang and its Analogues, which he used as an “expansible framework”. When it came to the slang of the years 1890 to 1945, Partridge was original and brilliant, especially in his treatment of underworld and military slang. His attitude towards language was scholarly and fun-loving, scientific and idiosyncratic. His body of work, scholarship, and dignity of approach led the way and set the standard for every other English-language slang lexicographer of the 20th century. Our respect for Partridge has not blinded us to the features of his work that have drawn criticism over the years. His protocol for alphabetizing was quirky. His dating was often problematic. His etymologies at times strayed from the plausible to the fanciful. His classification by register (slang, cant, jocular, vulgar, coarse, high, low, etc.) was intensely subjective and not particularly useful. Furthermore, his early decision to exclude American slang created increasingly difficult problems for him as the years passed and the influence of American slang grew. Lastly, Partridge at some point lost the ability to relate to the vocabulary he was recording. In 1937, Partridge was a man of his times, but the same could no longer be said in 1960. There is a profound relationship between language and culture, and neither Partridge nor Paul Beale, editor of the 8th edition, seems to have assimilated the cultural changes that began at the end of World War 2. This left them without the cultural knowledge needed to understand the language that they were recording. Their lack of cultural understanding accelerated with time, and sadly their later entries reflect this fact. “Beatniks” and “drug addicts”, and their slang, baffled Partridge and Beale, who lacked either the personal experience or historical perspective needed to understand the underlying countercultures. It showed. They just didn’t get it.


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